Hebrew Bible Isaiah 53
Jewish roots of Christianity

Yom Kippur: He bore the sins of many.

Each year on Yom Kippur, the High Priest chose two goats, one to symbolically carry the sins of the people into the wilderness, the other to be sacrificed on the altar to pacify God’s wrath over sin. He then entered the Holy of Holies of the Tabernacle and interceded before the Ark of the Covenant for his people for God to have mercy. About 1200 years after the Israelites celebrated the first Yom Kippur in the wilderness, Yeshua, who was without sin, became the true scapegoat, carrying our sin and putting it to death when He gave His life on the cross.

Waves on a beach
Jewish roots of Christianity

Who is a God like ours? Reflections on Rosh haShana

On Rosh haShana observant Jews very commonly recite this prayer from Micah 7:18-20, acknowledging our dependence on God’s mercy and forgiveness of sin. And the God of Heavens, the Holy One of Israel, loves to show mercy and forgive. What an awesome God we serve - there is none like Him!

Praying boy, looking out of the window
Encouragement Gallery

Against all hope: Faith in times of darkness

What is the purpose of having faith when we feel the wind blowing in our sails? When we see the sun shining on us, and we find goodness and blessings along our way? Isn’t rather that faith when we have no reason to believe? When we actually cannot see “the goodness of the Lord in the land of the living”?

Flying eagle
Daily His Disciple

Soaring like eagles: The pursuit of happiness.

If waiting on the LORD renews our strength, then why on earth do we keep running ahead of Him? We cannot stand unanswered prayer for too long, and since we like being in control, we take matters into our own hands. Maybe we give it a religious labelling (“I’m stepping out in faith”); while really we are fed up with waiting on God and try to push Him to start moving.